Tag Archives: Solidarity

Nabi Saleh stands in solidarity with Gaza – 1 August 2014

Photos by Tamimi Press and Haim Schwarczenburg: 1 August 2014

Text by Haim Schwarczenburg

The weekly Friday demonstration in the village of Nabi Saleh was a show of solidarity with the Palestinians in Gaza, who have been under constant Israeli fire in the past few weeks. Around 1500 Palestinians have been killed in the#Gaza strip so far, about a third of them children. Villagers accompanied by international and Israeli activists marched today from the centre of the village calling for an arms embargo on Israel, justice for the victims and an end to the massacre. The Israeli army responded with barrages of tear gas, rubber-coated steel bullets and a few rounds of live ammunition. No major injuries reported.

TAMIMI PRESS PHOTOS:

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HAIM SCHWARCZENBURG PHOTOS:

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Video: From Nabi Saleh to Ein Hijleh

Nabi Saleh Solidarity: 31 January 2013

After the weekly rally in Nabi Saleh, residents travelled to the Jordan Valley to participate in the Mileh al-Ard campaign and the repopulation of the Ein Hijleh in opposition to Israel’s ethnic cleansing and occupation.

Video by Bilal Tamimi

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Nabi Saleh stands in solidarity with Ein Hijleh

Nabi Saleh Solidarity: 31 January 2014

Late on Friday afternoon (Palestinian time), more than 300 Palestinians from across the Occupied West Bank repopulated the village of Ein Hijleh in the Jordan valley in opposition to Israel’s ongoing ethnic cleansing and occupation.  By early evening the number had grown to more than 500 people, with Palestinians from Nablus, Jerusalem, Bilin, Nabi Saleh and many other towns and villages joining the protest camp.

ein hijleh activestills group shot500 Palestinians repopulation Ein Hijleh in the Jordan Valley. Photo by Activestills
nabi saleh arrive - diana alzeerNabi Saleh residents arrive in Ein Hijleh. Photo by Diana Alzeer.
nabi saleh in ein hijleh - bilal tamimiNabi Saleh residents arriving in Ein Hijleh. Photo by Bilal Tamimi

The Popular Struggle Coordination Committe release the following statement:

PRESS RELEASE Friday, 31 January 2014

PalestiniansLaunch “Melh Al-Ard” Campaign by Reviving Ein Hijleh Village inthe Jordan Valley

Hundreds of Palestinians announced today the launching of “Melh Al-Ard” (Salt of the Earth) campaign by reviving the village of Ein Hijleh in the Jordan Valley on land belonging to the Orthodox Church and St. Gerassimos monastery. The campaign is launched in refusal of Israeli policies aimed at Judaizing and annexing the Jordan Valley.

Campaign organizers and participants declared,

We, the daughters and sons of Palestine, announce today the revival of Ein Hijleh village as part of Melh Al-Ard campaign in the Jordan Valley. The action aims at refusing the political status quo, especially given futile negotiations destroying the rights of our people for liberation and claim to their land.

Accordingly we have decided to revive an old Palestinian Canaanite village in the Jordan Valley next to so called “Route 90” linking the Dead Sea to Bisan. The action is part of a continuous step against the Israeli occupation’s plan to take over and annex the Jordan Valley. This step is a popular act against Israeli oppression of the Palestinian people and the constant Judaization of the land.

From the village of Ein Hijleh, we the participants announce that we hold tight to our right to all occupied Palestinian lands. We refuse Kerry’s Plan that will establish a disfigured Palestinian state and recognizes the Israeli entity as a Jewish State. Such a state will turn Palestinians living inside lands occupied in 1948 into residents and visitors that can be deported at anytime. We affirm the unity of our people and their struggle wherever they are for our inalienable rights.

Ein Hijleh village is located in what is called “Area C” in the Jordan Valley, which is under threat of annexation by Israeli policies and Kerry’s plan. Therefore, we have decided to take charge and call for a national action to protect the Jordan Valley and put an end to the constant Judaization of Palestinian lands.

Based on our support of the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions Movement (BDS) we call upon our friends and international solidarity groups to stand with the demands of the Palestinian people and boycott all Israeli companies including Israeli factories and companies that work in the Jordan Valley and profit from Palestinian natural resources.  

For instance, we ask you to boycott Mehadrin, the largest Israeli exporter of fruits and vegetables, some of which grown in the Jordan Valley. In addition, Hadiklaim, that exports dates produced by Israeli settlers in the Jordan Valley. We also call on you to boycott both Ahava and Premier, cosmetics companies that use Dead Sea minerals to produce its products.

Our Palestinian village is located near Deir Hijleh or St. Gerassimos monastery, on land that is property of the Orthodox monastery. The land mainly consists of few deserted old houses and palm trees. The white soil is highly concentrated with salt, and the area is surrounded by lands taken and used by Israeli settlers. An Israeli base is separating the land from Deir Hijleh monastery which owns a property of about 1000 dunams, some of which are taken by Israeli forces for the excuse of “security reasons.”  

The campaign, “Melh A-lArd” (Salt of the Earth), quotes a phrase from the bible, Matthew 13:5, which says, “You are the salt of the earth. But if the salt loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled underfoot.” The name of our village, Ein Hijleh, is based on the original Canaanite name and the water spring (Ein) present there.

We the sons and daughters of Ein Hijleh call upon our people to join the struggle to revive the village and protect our rights, history, culture, and land. Daughters and sons of Palestine, be the salt of this earth and stay steadfast on it.

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Video: Nabi Saleh marches in solidarity with the global march to Jerusalem.

7 June 2013 – Friday’s demonstration in Nabi Saleh was in solidarity with the Global March to Jerusalem. Activists on the ground report that Israeli Occupation Forces are firing teargas, rubber coat bullets and skunk.

Video by Bilal Tamimi

Video by David Reeb

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Nabi Saleh stands in solidarity with Aboud village and Palestinian martyr, Mohammed Asfour

On Friday  8 March and Friday 15th March, the residents of Nabi Saleh did not hold their weekly march in the village.On March 8, the residents of Nabi Saleh and their supporters joined the funeral for the martyr Mohammed ‘Asfour, 22 years, who died on Thursday March 7 as a result of being shot with a steel coated rubber bullet on February 22nd by the Israeli Occupation Forces with a rubber coat steel bullet.  Mohammed funeral was attacked by Israel Occupation Forces who fired teargas and steel coated rubber bullets at funeral goers.

On Friday, 15 March, the residents of Nabi Saleh and their supporters joined the Nabi Saleh  joined the nearby demonstration in Aboud village to commemorate Mohammed Asfour. The demonstration was  attacked by the IOF.

Below is a report and photos from French activist and photographer, Anne Paq on the March 8 funeral of Mohammed Asfour from her blog, Chroniques de Palestine: popular resistance and human rights.

***

Another funeral in Palestine: Muhammad Asfour from Abud village  08.03.2013

by Anne Paq: Chroniques de Palestine- Popular resistance and human rights

(c) Anne Paq/Activestills.org, Abud village, 08.03.2013
Clashes erupted between Palestinian youth and the Israeli army following the funeral procession of Muhammad Asfour in the West Bank village of Abud, March 8, 2013.

Muhammad Asfour, 23,  was shot in his head by a rubber coated steel bullet by an Israeli soldier, on February 22, 2013, during clashes in the entrance to his home village of Abud, northwest of Ramallah, during a solidarity protest with the hunger striking Palestinian prisoners held in Israeli prisons.
Asfour succumbed to his fatal injury after 2 weeks in the hospital.

The same day of his funeral; two other Palestinians were critically shot in Hebron and North of Gaza.

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Nabi Saleh marches in solidarity with Palestinian hunger strikers and Palestinian political prisoners

by Nabi Saleh Solidarity: 15 February 2013

Today’s unarmed demonstration (15 Feb) in Nabi Saleh marched in support of Palestinian hunger strikers, including Samer Issawi, Jafar Ezzedine, Tareq Qa’adan and Yousef Shaaban Yassi. The demonstration was violently attacked by Israeli Occupation Forces (IOF). During today’s demonstration, the IOF opened fire with rubber bullets, tear gas, sound grenades and skunk.

An 18 year old women, Rawal Tamimi, was injured when an IOF sound grenade hit her in the head and exploded. She was evacuated to hospital in Ramallah and remains in hospital over night. IOF also injured at least 3 others with rubber bullets and many others suffered from tear gas inhalation. IOF once again sprayed skunk inside the village and at houses – in once instance the IOF used a stun grenade to break the windows of the house of belonging to Bassem and Nariman Tamimi and skunk was sprayed inside the house.

 After weekly demonstration concluded, the IOF Leaving the village temporarily.  However, the IOF later returned to the village, firing teargas directly at houses. Skunk is also being sprayed. The IOF also closed the gate at the checkpoint at the front of the village and are searching cars.

demo- tamimi pressPhoto: Tamimi Press

IOF teargasing themselves - tamimi pressTeargas thrown back at IOF.  Photo: Tamimi Press

women soldiers - tamimi pressNabi Saleh women challenging IOF.  Photo: Tamimi Press

women teargas tamimi pressPhoto: Tamimi Press

rawal tamimi pressRawal Tamimi 18yrs injured by sound grenade thrown by IOF at her head.  Photo: Tamimi Press

rawal injury- keren manorRawal Tamimi being evacuated    Photo: Keren Manor/Activestills

nariman skunk 15 feb 2013Nariman Tamimi cleaning skunk from inside her house.   Photo: Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org

naji and boshra skunk

Boshra and Naji Tamimi scrubbing skunk spayed at their house and in their yard by IOF.  

Photo: Mareike Lauken/Activestills.org

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Police ban Israeli activists from Nabi Saleh and other West Bank demonstrations

by Leehee Rothschild: +972 Magazine: 11 November 2012

Thirteen anti-occupation activists were awoken by police officers early Sunday morning to receive closed military zone orders, preventing them from joining Palestinians in weekly demonstrations in the West Bank.

An Israeli activist displays a closed military zone order which, given to her by Israeli policemen at 6 a.m. in her Tel Aviv home, November 11, 2012. (photo: Activestills)

Israeli police officers distributed closed military zone orders for four West Bank villages early Sunday morning to 13 prominent activists in groups such as Anarchists Against the Wall, Ta’ayush, and the Sheikh Jarrah Solidarity Movement. In most cases, the military orders were delivered personally, but for some activists who happened not to be home, they were left under their doors. In some cases, the officers came to look for the activists in their old addresses, disturbing family members and friends, entering homes without a court order, and videotaping those present against their will, even after they were requested not to do so.

The orders, which are timed from 8:00 a.m. to 7 p.m. every Friday, and are valid from the beginning of September until March 4, define all or part of the villages of Bil’in, Nil’in, Nabi Saleh, and Kufr Qaddum as closed military zones, prohibiting any entrance into those areas. These are four of several villages in which Palestinians hold weekly demonstrations against the wall, joined regularly by Israeli and international activists.

The weekly demonstrations are deemed illegal under Israeli military law, much like any form of protest or demonstration in the West Bank. In fact, every Friday, the Israeli military issues orders defining those very villages as closed military zones. The demonstrations are violently dispersed by the Israeli army and police with tear gas, stun grenades, rubber bullets and live ammunition. The military’s violence has led to the death of 28 activists, and the wounding of countless others. Palestinian organizers and participants in those protests face ongoing persecution, includingnight raids on their homes, and long periods in prison, sometimes under administrative detention.

While Israeli demonstrators are often arrested, charges are usually not brought against them, and when they are, they rarely lead to conviction. It seems that this is what this latest operation seeks to circumvent. In a statement published on the INN website, a police representative of the Shai District (which oversees activities in the West Bank) stated [Hebrew]: “The orders… were distributed to them personally as part of an offensive action led by a commander in the area. It is being implemented in order to prevent illegal activities under the pretense of lack of awareness that the locations are closed military zones. This operation is part of the day to day activities of the Shai District against those who disrupt public order with nationalist motives from all sides of the political map (be it from the left or from the right).”

The police’s operation seems to be another attempt to sever the bonds between Palestinians and Israelis who take part in acts of popular resistance which challenge institutional policies of separation and segregation. However, those orders are unlikely to deter most activists who join the Palestinians in protest on a weekly basis.

 

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Nabi Saleh Marks 40 Days Anniversary to the Murder of Mustafa Tamimi

by Popular Struggle Coordination Committee: 21.01.2012

video by Israel Puterman

40 days after the killing of protester Mustafa Tamimi in Nabi Saleh, the village holds a march of commemoration. The army in response continues to shoot tear-gas canisters directly at protesters, against its own open-fire regulations. A medic was injured by two canisters shot directly at him.

Picture Credit: Oren Ziv/Activestills
Picture Credit: Oren Ziv/Activestills

Six weeks after the killing of Mustafa Tamimi by a tear-gas canister shot directly at him from close range, the village devotes weekly protest to his commemoration. The village of Nabi Saleh has been protesting for the past two years against the appropriation of the village’s spring by the neighboring settlement of Halamish. This week, protesters decided to march towards the village hilltops, overlooking the spring. Already as they were climbing the first hilltop, the peaceful demonstrators were met by a volley of tear-gas canisters. However, as wind carried most of the tear-gas back towards the soldiers, protesters were able to continue marching towards the adjacent village of Dir Nidham, which lands have also been taken over by Halamish settlers.

At this stage Israeli soldiers managed to climb up the next hilltop, which put them in a position to shoot tear-gas canisters directly at protesters. This manner of targeted shooting is in complete breach of the army’s own open fire regulations and already caused the death and injury of several protesters, including Mustafa Tamimi. One medic was injured during this assault after two consecutive tear-gas canisters hit him in the thigh. He was evacuated by fellow medics, who rushed to help him and carried him back towards the village. Soon after this, other demonstrators also made their way back to the village, but even then the Israeli soldiers continued shooting large amounts of tear-gas at them. Tear gas was also shot in the village’s populated areas, including into houses, as the soldiers entered the village. Several youth threw stones at the army jeeps to ward off this incursion. The demonstration was maintained for a few hours, with the army occasionally using the “skunk”, a water cannon spraying foul-smelling liquid, rubber coated bullets and a appliance which launches dozens of tear-gas canisters simultaneously.

 Picture Credit: Oren Ziv/Activestills
Picture Credit: Oren Ziv/Activestills

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Israeli activist stays in jail in solidarity with Palestinian activists arrested in Nabi Saleh

For the first time in many years, an Israeli activist chose to put into practice the notion promoted by Henry David Thoreau: “Under a government which imprisons any unjustly, the true place for a just man is also a prison…”

By Haggai Matar | Translated by Ruth Edmonds December 20, 2011|+972blog

Truth be told: We all should have acted like ‘A’. Every Friday, across the West Bank, Israelis and Palestinians demonstrate together. They stand together opposite the same soldiers, chant the same slogans, give the same speeches, run away from the same clouds of tear gas and the same spray from the disgusting “skunk” machines, and get arrested for the same reasons and with the same false accusations.

 However, it is at that point that the legal mechanisms of racism start kicking in. The Israelis are released from the police station with limited conditions or with similar conditions from court. An Israeli detainee has to be brought in front of a judge within 24 hours. The Palestinians are taken to Ofer Military Prison. From the outset, the military orders that dictate their lives allow the authorities to detain them for eight whole days before they are even required to allow judicial review of the detention. Even then, in most cases, the court will decide to allow an extension and then another extension and then detention till the procedure regarding an indictment has ended. This process can take a number of months and in the end, the arrested Palestinian is released. The arrested Israeli, however, his friend and partner, was free that whole time.

That is how it always is under apartheid law. As a rule, we activists always made sure that if Palestinians were arrested, Israelis are arrested too so as to show solidarity, to protect our friends inside detention and to document the way they are treated. But then we sign the required injunction – and go back home.

Until A. came along. A. was arrested last Friday together with 20 Israelis, Palestinians and internationals at the main demonstration in Nabi Saleh marking a week since the murder of Mustafa Tamimi. Among those arrested was a close family member of the Tamimis, Mohammed Tamimi, as well as Mohammed Khatib from the Popular Committee of Bil’in – one of the most moral, creative, funny, determined, brave and moving people I have ever met in my life. When the time came to sign the conditional release form at the police station (a 15 day-injunction to stay away from Nabi Saleh) A. and another friend refused. They were brought before the judge, refused again, and were sent back to detention. They notified the authorities that they were standing in solidarity with their friends Tamimi and Khatib and they would not agree to be released while the two others were still in detention.

In the end, Khatib was released and so was A.’s friend, who finally signed the conditional release form. But Tamimi and A. stayed in detention – Friday, Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Yesterday morning (Monday) A. was supposed to be brought in front of a Magistrate’s Court in Jerusalem, which was expected to extend her detention once again. However, the police had apparently grown tired of A., and decided to release her without conditions – thus almost literally throwing her out of her detention cell.

A. succeeding in communicating an exceptional message of solidarity. She demonstrated, with her action, with her imprisoned body in a disgusting cell at the Russian Compound in Jerusalem, the absurdity of the apartheid laws of the occupation, the way they differentiate between partners in the struggle by their origins, by the nationality dictated to them, by the ID card they carry in their pockets.

The distance between home to jail

The truth is that this is what we all should have been doing. Just like we are arrested together, so should we stay in prison together. We should refuse, all of us, to sign the release forms, all the Israeli activists arrested in the same protest together with all the Palestinian activists. Our community “elders” say that once, it really was like that, in the first Intifada and before. Everyone refused, everyone was jailed together (at the time, they explained, authorities would not separate between the arrestees at the detention center, unlike today).

Bus alas, we do not refuse. We sign. We give up on demonstrations for two weeks in one place and go to others, and then come back again to the place from where we were originally banned. At the end of the day we always go home: to comfortable warmth, to a soft bed, to sleepy cats, to familiar food, to favourite books and to the embraces of lovers. We go back to routines, to work, to tasks, to meetings, to nights out, to Facebook, to the blogs, the newspapers, the greengrocer, the neighbour whose bike is blocking ours, to family dinners, to a light that needs fixing in the hall, to our studies and to the streets that turn into a river when it rains for more than five minutes.

Our friends do not. They stay dressed in IPS (Israeli Prison Service) issued uniform, in a cold tent in Ofer Military Prison, with nothing from home. Remember how Abudallah Abu Rahmah described the months in jail with no shoes and no watch? Well, it’s something like that.

Abu Rahmah, like Tamimi and Khatib, are the men jailed under a government that unjustly imprisons just about anyone. They are the men Thoreau was referring to. And this is the place for the just man to be imprisoned too. A. was doing the most just thing that can be done under the regime we have here.

There is no end to the reasons for signing a release form, for the reasons to return home. It can be said practically that it will not help since, of course, the Palestinians are not released any sooner due to this refusal. It can be said that it just snatches away more good activists who are very much needed on the outside. It can be said that a worthy struggle requires not only fairness but also the well-being of the strugglers, and there is a need to do as much as possible so as to survive and not burn out. It can be said that it is a more sustainable way as opposed to a situation where we will all be in jail. And it’s true. It’s all true. However, despite everything, there is something very right, more right, in A.’s actions. Something that marks clearer than ever before the ugliness of the system. And like a beacon of light illuminates the alternative to this method. Therefore, today, also those of us sitting at home – we are all A.

Haggai Matar is an Israeli journalist and political activist, focusing mainly on the struggle against the occupation. He is currently working at Zman Tel Aviv, the local supplement of Maariv newspaper, and at the independent Hebrew website MySay.

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Nabi Saleh salutes Freedom Waves flotialla

By Popular Struggle Coordination Committee: 4 November 2011

Nabi Saleh demonstration salutes the Freedom Wave Flotilla. A young Palestinian photographer, Hazma Yassin from Bil’in, was arrested and beaten while raising his hands.

Dozens participated in this week’s demonstration in Nabi Saleh against the Israeli occupation and settlements. Nabi Saleh residents, Palestinian activists, and international and Israeli supporters wore “Freedom Flotilla” ribbons to salute the Freedom Waves to Gaza flotilla activists in their attempt to break the Israeli naval siege on Gaza.

Slightly after noon, a peaceful procession started at the center of the village and headed towards the village farmlands and spring, taken over by settlers. Israeli forces blocked the protesters from approaching the spring, shooting masses of tear gas from two different locations at the protesters. Two men were injured due to gas inhalation and required medical attention.

Hamza Yaseen Shortly Before His Arrest, Nabi Saleh
Hamza Yaseen (19) from Bil’in, shortly before being arrested in Nabi Saleh

From there on demonstrators kept going back and forth on the village’s main road towards the exit, blocked by Israeli forces. Others threw stones to ward off the army incursion. The army used a foul-smelling water cannon, rubber coated steel bullets and tear gas projectiles. Both the bullets and projectiles were shot indiscriminately and directly at protesters, sometimes at a pace of about a dozen at once, using automated cannons. As a result, more than a dozen were slightly injured. One protester required medical treatment and was taken to a hospital, after his finger was hit and broken by a rubber-coated bullet.

Near the end of the demonstration, and for no apparent reason, four Israeli jeeps entered the village and circled inside it, stones hurled at them throughout. At a certain point Israeli soldiers also hid behind a military tower, leaving the road clear, and then reappeared chasing nearing protesters. One Palestinian photographer, Hamza Yaseen from the village of Bil’in was beaten while raising his hands in the air, and then arrested. He is accused on stone-throwing, despite the fact that he was carrying a camera throughout the demonstration.

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